Yamaha CP1

Stage PianoYamaha's flagship portable piano series is based on the newly developed Spectral Component Modelling technology that combines both the acoustic and the electronic piano sound sample technology with high-performance physical modelling. There is even an independent FM tone generator for the Yamaha DX7 typical piano sounds integrated in the instrument, so that these sounds can be converted to a high-quality basis. The non-graded wooden keyboard with synthetic ivory-like surface layers is especially interesting when compared to alternative solutions from other manufacturers, as it represents a smooth and fluid option that does not only show its strength in longer stage performances.

  • (Weighted wooden deck with synthetic ivory) 88 keys, NW-STAGE keyboard
  • Sound Source: SCM (Spectral Component Modeling)
  • 5 Modelling system blocks: acoustic / electric piano preamp, modulation effects, PowerAmp compressor and cabinet modelling
  • 17 sounds: Acoustic and electric pianos
  • Polyphony: 128
  • Master keyboard functions up to 4 split zones
  • Pitch wheel
  • Display: 55 characters x 2 lines
  • Vacuum fluorescent display (VFD)
  • Connections: symmetrical and asymmetrical, headphones, connections for Foot Switch (SUSTAIN, sostenuto, soft, ASSIGNABLE) and foot controller, MIDI IN / OUT / Thru, USB;.. to Host and To Device
  • Dimensions: 1385 x 173 x 420 mm
  • Weight: 27.2 kg
  • Incl. power cord, Pedal unit, "Illustrated Guide to the CP1" booklet, manual, data list, Software DVD-ROM (including Steinberg Cubase AI)
No JavaScript? No Audio Samples! :-(

Sound samples

 
0:00
  • Classical Piano
  • E-piano 1
  • E-piano 2
  • Funk Wurli
  • Pop Piano

Further information

Number Of Keys 88
hammer mechanics Yes
Number of simultaneous tones 128
Number Of Sounds 17
Effects Yes
Speaker No
Headphone Outputs 1
Sequencer No
Metronome No
MIDI keyboard-function Yes
Pitch Bend Yes
Modulation Wheel No
Split Zones 4
Layer Function Yes
MIDI interface 1x In, 1x Out, 1x Thru

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If you order this product together with others as part of a bundle, you can save up to %4 additionally!
Yamaha CP1 + Millenium KS-2000 + the t.bone HD 880 + Thomann Keyboard Bag 6 +
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starting from €4,999
1 customer ratings:
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handling
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Yamaha CP1- fantastic keyboard combined with excellent sounds

peter m. mahr, 14.08.2010

Zum Thema E-Pianos nur so viel. Ich kann mich hier ganz und gar nicht dem Tester anschließen, der gerade Fender Rhodes und Wurlitzer Pianos keine guten Noten gegeben hat. Vielleicht auch gleich an dieser Stelle, die paar Parameter die einem zur Verfügung stehen, hat man schnell unter den Fingern und nicht zuletzt der Master EQ kann hier einiges bewirken. Da ich seit kurzem ein Rhodes Mark 7 mein Eigen nennen darf, kann ich guten Gewissens sagen, dass Yamaha gerade im Falle der Rhodessounds einen Super Job hingelegt hat. Die unterschiedlichen Modelle haben durch die Bank Charakter und können sehr, sehr leicht und schnell den eigenen Wünschen angepasst werden. Ähnliches gilt für das Wurlitzer - mit ein wenig Editieren hat man Sounds, die allemal als sehr gut zu bezeichnen sind. Dass ein gut gepflegtes Original IMMER besser und - logischerweise - authentischer klingt, wird wohl von niemandem geleugnet werden. Letztendlich sind es auch hier Samples, aber ebenso in hervorragender Qualität... teils auch mit den Eigenheiten der Originale versehen. Was die Zonen und die dynamische Überblendung betrifft, so sehe ich das ähnlich wie im Falle der beiden Flügel. Sehr gut gelungen! Viel Erfolg beim Identifizieren der Überblendungspunkte.

Was mir hingegen nicht zu gefallen wusste - kurios, im Prinzip - sind das hauseigene CP-80 und die DX Sounds. Beides eigene Entwicklungen und gerade im Falle der FM hätte ich mir von Yamaha wesentlich mehr erwartet. Dabei spreche ich hier noch nicht einmal von der Bearbeitung der Sounds. An dieser Stelle mag sich auch der Synthesizerspieler in mir durchsetzen, der über Jahre FM Sounds programmiert hat. Typische und mittlerweile, doch verstaubte 80er DX-Pianos kann ich einfach nicht mehr hören. Das mag aber jeder für sich bewerten. Ich hätte hier TX-816 und GS-1 Sounds, sowie das eine oder andere DX-1 E-Piano für besser befunden.

Die Verarbeitung würde ich mit 4.8 bewerten. Gesamt ist für mich im Falle des CP1 nur ein "sehr zufrieden" gerechtfertigt. Das CP1 hat meine Art und Weise Musik zu schreiben verändert und mit dazu beigetragen, dass ich nun auch das angesprochene Rhodes Mk7 hier stehen habe... und gerade wenn ich letzteres anspiele und dazu im Vergleich das CP1 höre weiß ich, dass Letzteres hoffentlich sehr lange hier in meinem Studio verweilen wird. Ein Topgerät !!! Nur die Preisdifferenz zum kleineren Bruder CP5, die scheint mir unrealistisch und letztendlich auch nicht wirklich erklärlich." data-mt-lang="en-x-mtfrom-de" data-translated="After many years, I have now landed on my first digital piano. Years ago still unimaginable. Kurt Ader, who told me about the qualities of the latest Yamaha sprout, not only listened attentively, but also made me curious. Long story short, who can afford the CP1 or its smaller brother, should play one of the two instruments absolutely. <br><br> The Yamaha Flügelsounds are - especially - in connection with the excellent keyboard very, very good. What is modeled on it is beyond my knowledge, especially since the sample zones can be attributed definitively and the output sound material is thus clear. However, this is of excellent quality. But since there was a lot of discussion about the modeling in different forums, without real substantial information (this may be different in the meantime), but what is simply stunning is the dynamic overlap, and maybe the Yamaha component of modeling (the effects It is in any case). However, the result is simply stunning, as I just mentioned, in the dynamic way of playing. <br><br> How is it compared to Roland's V-Piano? For me clear winner - CP1. It is similar to the North. No question cheaper and anything but bad is the red Swede, but still the Nordic alternative is not enough. Still, Yamaha might have done well to look a bit out of the box and the CP1 possibly a Steinway, Fazioli or even a Bösendorfer (.... the "proximity" would be given). What I personally miss in the case of the S6 are the resonances in the lower keyboard range (eg dis). Other users said just that would be just authentic. Ok, be, I'm bothered. <br><br> On E-Pianos only so much. I can not agree with the tester, who has not given any good marks to Fender Rhodes and Wurlitzer Pianos. Perhaps right at this point, the few parameters available to one, one has quickly under the fingers and not least the Master EQ can cause a lot here. Since I have recently been able to name a Rhodes Mark 7 myself, I can safely say that Yamaha has just done a super job in the case of the Rhodessounds. The different models have by the bank character and can very, very easily and quickly customized to their own wishes. The same applies to the Wurlitzer - with a little editing you have sounds, which are always very good. The fact that a well-maintained original ALWAYS better and - logically - more authentic, will probably be denied by anyone. In the end it is also samples, but also in excellent quality ... partly also with the characteristics of the originals. As for the zones and the dynamic fading, I see this as in the case of the two wings. Very well done! Good luck in identifying the crossfade points. <br><br> What I did not like, however - curious, in principle - are the in-house CP-80 and the DX sounds. Both my own developments and especially in the case of FM, I would have expected from Yamaha much more. Here I do not even speak of the editing of the sounds. At this point, the synthesizer player, who has programmed FM sounds for years, can also find his way into me. Typical and meanwhile, but dusty 80s DX-Pianos I simply can not hear more. This is something everyone can judge for themselves. I would have found TX-816 and GS-1 sounds, as well as one or the other DX-1 electric piano for better. <br><br> The processing I would rate with 4.8. Overall for me in the case of the CP1 is only a "very satisfied" justified. The CP1 has changed my way of writing music and has contributed to the fact that I now also have the Rhodes Mk7 mentioned here ... and just when I appeal to the latter and compared to the CP1 I know that the latter hopefully very much Long here in my studio will linger. A top device !!! Only the price difference to the smaller brother CP5, which seems to me unrealistic and ultimately also not really explicable." > After many years, I have now landed on my first digital piano. Years ago still unimaginable. Kurt Ader, who told me about the qualities of the latest Yamaha sprout, not only listened attentively, but also made me curious. Long story short, who can afford the CP1 or its smaller brother, should play one of the two instruments absolutely.

The Yamaha Flügelsounds are - especially - in connection with the excellent keyboard very, very good. What is modeled on it is beyond my knowledge, especially since the sample zones can be attributed definitively and the output sound material is thus clear. However, this is of excellent quality. But since there was a lot of discussion about the modeling in different forums, without real substantial information (this may be different in the meantime), but what is simply stunning is the dynamic overlap, and maybe the Yamaha component of modeling (the effects It is in any case). However, the result is simply stunning, as I just mentioned, in the dynamic way of playing.

How is it compared to Roland's V-Piano? For me clear winner - CP1. It is similar to the North. No question cheaper and anything but bad is the red Swede, but still the Nordic alternative is not enough. Still, Yamaha might have done well to look a bit out of the box and the CP1 possibly a Steinway, Fazioli or even a Bösendorfer (.... the "proximity" would be given). What I personally miss in the case of the S6 are the resonances in the lower keyboard range (eg dis). Other users said just that would be just authentic. Ok, be, I'm bothered.

On E-Pianos only so much. I can not agree with the tester, who has not given any good marks to Fender Rhodes and Wurlitzer Pianos. Perhaps right at this point, the few parameters available to one, one has quickly under the fingers and not least the Master EQ can cause a lot here. Since I have recently been able to name a Rhodes Mark 7 myself, I can safely say that Yamaha has just done a super job in the case of the Rhodessounds. The different models have by the bank character and can very, very easily and quickly customized to their own wishes. The same applies to the Wurlitzer - with a little editing you have sounds, which are always very good. The fact that a well-maintained original ALWAYS better and - logically - more authentic, will probably be denied by anyone. In the end it is also samples, but also in excellent quality ... partly also with the characteristics of the originals. As for the zones and the dynamic fading, I see this as in the case of the two wings. Very well done! Good luck in identifying the crossfade points.

What I did not like, however - curious, in principle - are the in-house CP-80 and the DX sounds. Both my own developments and especially in the case of FM, I would have expected from Yamaha much more. Here I do not even speak of the editing of the sounds. At this point, the synthesizer player, who has programmed FM sounds for years, can also find his way into me. Typical and meanwhile, but dusty 80s DX-Pianos I simply can not hear more. This is something everyone can judge for themselves. I would have found TX-816 and GS-1 sounds, as well as one or the other DX-1 electric piano for better.

The processing I would rate with 4.8. Overall for me in the case of the CP1 is only a "very satisfied" justified. The CP1 has changed my way of writing music and has contributed to the fact that I now also have the Rhodes Mk7 mentioned here ... and just when I appeal to the latter and compared to the CP1 I know that the latter hopefully very much Long here in my studio will linger. A top device !!! Only the price difference to the smaller brother CP5, which seems to me unrealistic and ultimately also not really explicable.
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