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Gold Tone AC-1 5 String Openback Banjo

11

Banjo

  • 5 cordes
  • Fond ouvert
  • Manche en acajou
  • Touche en blackwood
  • Corps en composite
  • Peau 11" Remo LC revêtue
  • Repères "points"
  • Filet noir en ABS
  • Barre de réglage (Truss Rod) double action
  • Diapason: 665 mm
  • Largeur au sillet: 30,2 mm
  • Sillet Zero Glide
  • Chevalet en érable avec sillet en ébène
  • Cordier ajustable
  • 22 frettes
  • 16 tirants
  • Cercle de tension plat
  • Mécaniques fermées
  • Accordage: Sol, Ré, Sol, Si, Ré
  • Accastillage chromé
  • Couleur: Noir mat
  • Livré en housse
Nombre de cordes 5
Corps Matière plastique
Manche Acajou
Frettes 22
Étui inclus Non
Housse incluse Oui
Micro Non
Référencé depuis Avril 2018
Numéro d'article 436495
255 €
Tous les prix TVA incl. (TTC)
Disponible immédiatement
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Informations sur l'expédition
Livraison gratuite estimée entre le Mercredi, 8.12. et le Jeudi, 9.12.
1
21 Classement des ventes

10 Evaluations client

4.9 / 5

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Qualité de fabrication

p
pascalbrun 28.07.2021
absolument ravi de mon achat
son clair ,manche trés facile a jouer
parfait pour débuter
l'instrument est léger mais d'une sonorité puissante pour un open back
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google translate gb
Une erreur est malheureusement survenue, veuillez réessayer ultérieurement svp.
GY
Best beginner banjo choice?
Gwen Yver 04.11.2021
This is a beginner's banjo. I've seen it suggested that because it is lightweight and durable, it could also be a second/travel banjo for a more experienced player, and that certainly seems plausible, but most of the people I've seen suggesting it have had a professional interest in people buying as many banjos as possible.

The problem with reviewing beginner's banjos is that they're played by beginners. Having had the Gold Tone AC-1 a week or so, I can truthfully say is it's the best banjo I've ever played. It's also the worst banjo I've ever played. It only really sounds good and banjo-y for a few fleeting seconds every so often, but that's not the fault of the banjo.

What I can say, and what I haven't seen elsewhere, is why I chose this and not a different beginner's banjo. I suspect the best choice of beginner banjo is the Deering Goodtime like everyone says it is, but it's also a hundred or so of your preferred currency unit more than any other beginner banjo and backordered to heck and back, so it was never really an option.

Ultimately, the choice comes down to the Gold Tone AC-1, the Epiphone MB-100, and the Recording King Dirty 30s open back banjo. All of these seem to be perfectly good choices - for what it's worth, I'd have picked the RK over the Epi if I hadn't gone for the Gold Tone.

The Gold Tone is a few currency units more, but once you factor in the price of a gig bag, which comes included with the AC-1 but not the other two, they're a wash in terms of price. You get more aesthetics with the others, nicer inlays, prettier tuners, a wooden rim. The AC-1 is utilitarian - basic guitar style fret board and tuners, no embellishment to speak of, and the rim is composite (that's plastic to you and me).

That may sound like faint praise, but it's the whole reason I chose this banjo. In this price range, savings are going to be made somewhere, and I'd rather they be be made on form rather than function. I suspect that plastic rim's going to last a whole lot better than a cheaper wooden rim, and it sounds fine. Well, just as fine as this beginner banjo player can make it sound, at any rate.
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google translate gb
Une erreur est malheureusement survenue, veuillez réessayer ultérieurement svp.
b
Cheapest banjo still worth playing
bunditty 05.12.2020
As an aspiring banjo player, I did my research, and I have found this is the cheapest banjo that still comes as recommended by veteran players.

As advertised, Gold Tone does not skimp on quality control and only ships instruments that are ready to be played. Having received it, I examined it in accordance with online tutorials. Every part of the instrument, from the head tension, to action, to bridge placement, was adjusted correctly, ensuring I did not have to learn to set up a banjo the first moment I held it in my hands (and there's a lot to learn about banjo setup!). All I had to do is tune it.

Learning to play it is a pleasure, as it rings bright and clear, and stays in tune for a long time. It is pretty loud, despite the open back. A resonator can be bought from Gold Tone to attach to it, making it even louder.

Generally, it is well made both at first glance and on second deeper look. There's no bump, no irregularity, no crack, no notch to be found, and all the materials seem to be of high quality.

The matte black finish on the ebony neck and the composite rim is beautiful, like an old piano, and seamless - nobody will tell the difference. The fretboard is also visually appealing.

Now, the downsides.

The finish is unfortunately very delicate. I have scratched it with my fingernails, by just accidentally lightly bumping the headstock against the wall, and when I attempted to attach a clip-on strap. This doesn't have to be a downside if you just treat it as the instrument gaining character, but I felt it should be mentioned.

The pot is basically weightless compared to the neck, which makes it difficult if not impossible to play without a strap. Otherwise, you will be supporting the weight of the neck with your left hand, which makes fretting very hard.

Fortunately, a good strap fixes that problem easily, and there's plenty of information online on how to properly attach it. I recommend using a strap which you tie onto the banjo (you can do this with any guitar strap and some sturdy cord) rather than one with clips, which can damage the finish, vibrate and make a sound, or snap and break at the worst moment.

The gig bag is... there. It's paper thin, and by the time you'll be thinking of going to actual gigs, you'll be wanting to upgrade. It's still useful - I keep the banjo inside it to prevent gathering dust or accidental damage.

The lack of an arm rest definitely contributes to it being so inexpensive, but after an hour of playing you'll be looking at a dent in your forearm. A soft fabric wristband fixes this problem, alternatively, arm rests can be bought from Gold Tone.

Overall: I love it. I'm enjoying every day playing it and getting better. The downsides are minor and easily overcome with a little independent thinking, which banjo will require of you either way. I highly recommend it to anyone looking to start out on their banjo journey smoothly and without having to deal with hit-or-miss hardware and fixing factory mistakes yourself.
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Une erreur est malheureusement survenue, veuillez réessayer ultérieurement svp.
K
Best you can get for the price
Kegsi 11.11.2021
In some aspects it does feel cheap.
But they did not compromise on sound and functionality.
If your not willing to get somthing over €500 then get this or the AC-5
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