the t.bone SC 400

Studio Large Diaphragm Condenser Microphone

  • 1" Gold membrane
  • Directivity: Super-cardioid
  • Frequency range: 20 - 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: 23.3 mV / Pa
  • Equivalent noise level: 18 dB (A)
  • Output impedance: 120 Ohm
  • Peak SPL: 132 dB
  • Internal low cut switch at 100 Hz with 6 dB
  • Requires +48 V phantom power
  • Weight of the microphone: 351 g
  • Colour: Black
  • Shock mount and bag included
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Audio Examples

 
0:00
  • Ballad
  • Soul
  • Ballad Male
  • Soul Male
  • Ballad Dry
  • Soul Dry
  • Ballad Male Dry
  • Soul Male Dry
  • Show more

Further Information

Tube No
Switchable Polar Pattern No
Omnidirectional No
Cardioid Yes
Figure-8 No
Low Cut Yes
Pad No
shockmount included Yes
USB Microphone No

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If you order this product together with others as part of a bundle, you can save up to 5 % additionally!
DBX 286 S + the t.bone SC 400 +
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SPL Goldmike 9844 + the t.bone SC 400 + Cordial CAM 6 BK +
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the t.bone SC 400 + Millenium MS 2003 +
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Our most popular Large Diaphragm Microphones
2508 Customer Ratings
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Easiest mic I've ever used.
Josh Colletta, 22.04.2020
To give you a bit of an introduction, I've been working in broadcasting for 27 years. This is my first full-range, studio-use condenser microphone; though I've used some that weren't my own. I've owned and used dynamic microphones pretty much all my life. I've used some good and some bad; some dirt cheap, and some at the top of the price list for their purpose. The expensive ones weren't always the best, but at the same time, the cheap ones weren't always the best, either.

My voice has a very de-nasal bump right around 800Hz, and between the frequency response of those mics and the ability I (or whoever's engineering) have to EQ them with whatever they're plugged into, it can be very hard to make them sound like my unamplified voice does to the average ear. In fact, the microphone that I had plugged in to my chain before I received the SC 400 required TWO bands on my parametric EQ to be set to 800Hz and cranked WAY down.

I plugged in the t.bone SC 400 and reset my entire EQ to zero. I was prepared to test it out as long as it took to get it right.

It took thirty seconds.

All I need is one band at 800Hz turned down to about 25%, and this things sounds BEAUTIFUL. Crisp highs -- I actually had to back those down a little, too, but not by much -- perfect low end, not a single other thing adjusted to compensate. Never in my life has it been that simple. The SC 400 sounds very natural, it's very sensitive, and I have been thoroughly enjoying every moment with it.

I'm using it for home voiceover recording and, eventually, podcasting and radio. In fact, as I type this, I just moments ago ordered a mixer and audio interface right here at Thomann in preparation for that.

I don't have any "cons" to give you, but as many people seem to be buying this as an entry-level studio condenser (as I did) and likely need some help adjusting, let me give you a couple of notes:

Sensitivity is going to be the first thing you notice, because the SC 400 has plenty of it. If you're not familiar with how to read sensitivity figures for microphones, I'll just give you the basic idea: where you see "dB re 1V/PA," the higher the number in that spec, the more sensitive the microphone is. The SC 400 is rated at -32.6 dB in that category. One of my other microphones, the Audio-Technica PRO 61 (a dynamic), is rated at -55 dB in that category. If I switch back and forth between the two, my preamp will have to be significantly adjusted to compensate.

The SC 400 is a hypercardioid microphone, meaning the most sensitive, accurate-sounding area around it is dead-center, right in front of the diaphragm. If you move around your microphone a lot, you're going to find yourself off-axis and sounding distant rather often. This mic is generally intended for studio situations where you or your talent are stationary in front of it (such as vocal recordings or radio broadcasts). This attribute COULD be used in a live sound setting to avoid feedback, but don't forget about that sensitivity, because even if it's off-axis, it WILL still pick up sounds from all around you. In ANY setting, I highly recommend a noise gate.

Being a condenser, the SC 400 is meant to be used at a slight distance away from the mouth. You don't want to eat this microphone, it will not do you any favors. Now, that said, I do personally keep it closer to my face, but I also keep it slightly off to the side so that the front of the diaphragm IS still pointed at my mouth, but the direct wind from my speech is passing over the TOP of the mic, not directly into it. This prevents plosives while still providing the proximity effect. In fact, I recommend that technique with ANY microphone. Old trick of the trade that seems to have been lost over the years.

Bottom line: just buy this microphone. You will not regret it.
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Perfectly acceptable for studio use
Mark8610, 17.02.2016
This is a large diaphragm studio condenser microphone, albeit a small one. If you are used to using dynamic microphones for recording you will instantly notice the improvement - the crystal clarity that a large diaphragm condenser gives in comparison.
This is also a very cheap large diaphragm studio condenser microphone. In my experience, normally that cheapness would be reflected in the quality of the built-in pre-amp. I expected a relatively high noise floor - background hiss with the gain turned up to record quiet sources. I have to report it's not there.
According to the included specification sheet, this microphone has a better noise performance than my Audio Technica AT4033. It would be a complex process for me to actually measure if that is actually true, but in using the two side by side I have no reason to believe that the performance is worse.
I have used this mic to record vocals and acoustic guitar, both of which it does very well. It doesn't have a built-in pad, so I wouldn't use it for anything loud like horns. The low-cut switch is internal and requires unscrewing the body - but this is only required for close mic-ing, and these mics are best used with a bit of distance between source and mic (with a pop-screen for vocals).
The included shock mount is a necessity for this type of microphone, and the one supplied does the job quite adequately (considering you could spend the same money for just a shock mount on its own).
If you haven't yet recorded with a large diaphragm condenser, then get yourself one of these. Just remember though, the money you save on buying this (rather than a more expensive model) will have to be spent on acoustic screening once having a decent mic shows up how bad your room acoustics really are. But you'd have to do that if you spent more on a mic.
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Pena Gorse, 13.04.2021
So I have mixed feelings about the t.bone SC 400. While it has held up very well for years and still is my go-to podcasting mic, it is not my first pick. If you want to record instruments, grab a shure sm57 instead, save a few bucks. The t.bone is also not that good for recording electric guitars, unless you want a trve black metal sound. However, if you only record vocals and acoustic guitars (or do podcasts), this is a GREAT choice. It is cheap, reasonably durable, small, and has a great sound quality.
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Very Sensitive
Andy 'Small hands', 13.04.2021
I've used the t.bone for home recording of vocals & acoustic guitar. The microphone is very sensitive so some acoustic shielding is recommended to avoid picking up every stray noise in the house. The sound is clear, but needs a bit of extra EQ.

It's a good microphone for the price!
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48 €
Including VAT; Excluding 2,50 € shipping
Available immediately
Available immediately

This item is in stock and can be dispatched immediately.

Standard Delivery Times

Delivery approx. between Tuesday, 20.04. and Wednesday, 21.04.

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