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Online Guide Equalisers
Filter typs

 


ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
Shelving
EQ

shelving EQ

ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
Shelving
EQs are most often seen on domestic hi-fi systems. They typically have a single control per band that boosts or
CutTo make a break or split in a piece of audio. Traditionally this was done with a razor blade where magnetic tape was physically cut.
cuts
the
TrimThe initial gain control on a mixer or other audio device such as a mic preamp, often labelled 'gain'. Trim/gain adjustment is crucial to maintaining a clean gain structure and good signal-to-noise ratio.
gain
at a pre-determined frequency, often labelled ‘Treble’ and ‘Bass’, or ‘HF’ and ‘LF’ (for ‘high frequency’ and ‘low frequency’). All frequencies beyond the
PresetA program or patch forming part of a synthesizer of other device's factory-shipped state. Presets usually can't be overwritten, but they may usually be edited and the result stored to a user program.
preset
frequency are affected. Typically, low
ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
shelving
EQ on a mixing desk will be fixed at around 80-100Hz, and high
ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
shelving
at 10-12kHz. The maximum amount of
CutTo make a break or split in a piece of audio. Traditionally this was done with a razor blade where magnetic tape was physically cut.
cut
or
TrimThe initial gain control on a mixer or other audio device such as a mic preamp, often labelled 'gain'. Trim/gain adjustment is crucial to maintaining a clean gain structure and good signal-to-noise ratio.
gain
that can be applied is usually in the
RegionA region is usually a section of MIDI or audio first defined by recording or imported length, which can be copied, edited or deleted non-destructively as part of the editing process in a DAW.
region
of 12-15dB.


ClippingAudio distortion caused by overloading, visible as flattened waveform peaks at the maximum possible voltage.
Peaking
Filters

This type of
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filter
allows you to
CutTo make a break or split in a piece of audio. Traditionally this was done with a razor blade where magnetic tape was physically cut.
cut
or
BoostIn audio mixing this refers to increasing the gain or amplitude of an audio signal. Usually employed in equalisation.
boost
a limited band of frequencies in the middle of the spectrum, rather than all the frequencies above or below a specific point, as with
ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
shelving
EQ. c As with
ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
shelving
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filters
, there is a similar slope around the cutoff frequency, typically of around 6dB per octave, although in this case it falls off either side of the chosen centre frequency.


Sweepable EQ

The frequency range covered by an EQ is traditionally broken up into specific
GroupThe combination of a number of audio channels in hardware or software so that they may be controlled together.
groups
- highs, mids and lows, and these are normally represented on a
ConsoleA device through which audio signals are routed for mixing, monitoring, processing and re-routed for either recording, amplification or both. A console contains a number of channel strips and a selection of auxiliary, monitoring and main outputs.
console
by a series of knobs on each channel strip, with each frequency
GroupThe combination of a number of audio channels in hardware or software so that they may be controlled together.
group
having separate controls. For each frequency band, a standard ‘sweepable’ or ‘semi-parametric’ EQ will have one control for adjusting the centre frequency to be affected, scaled in
HertzThe unit of frequency, used for both sound and all forms of electromagnetic radiation including light and radio waves. 1Hz = 1 cycle (complete wave) per second.
Hertz
, and another for adjusting
TrimThe initial gain control on a mixer or other audio device such as a mic preamp, often labelled 'gain'. Trim/gain adjustment is crucial to maintaining a clean gain structure and good signal-to-noise ratio.
gain
, expressed in decibels. The mid frequency band will typically be adjustable from around 200Hz to 6kHz.


Parametric EQ

Parametric EQ


Parametric EQ: KLARK Dual

Parametric EQ is the most flexible type of EQ, and is essentially a
ClippingAudio distortion caused by overloading, visible as flattened waveform peaks at the maximum possible voltage.
peaking
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filter
that incorporates a
BandwidthThe range of frequencies passed by a bandpass filter (the difference between the upper and lower cut-off frequencies).
bandwidth
control, sometimes known as ‘Q’ for ‘quality factor’, along with the usual frequency and
TrimThe initial gain control on a mixer or other audio device such as a mic preamp, often labelled 'gain'. Trim/gain adjustment is crucial to maintaining a clean gain structure and good signal-to-noise ratio.
gain
controls.
BandwidthThe range of frequencies passed by a bandpass filter (the difference between the upper and lower cut-off frequencies).
Bandwidth
is scaled in octaves, ranging from narrow (fractions of an octave), to broad (around 3 octaves). As a rule of thumb, the broader the
BandwidthThe range of frequencies passed by a bandpass filter (the difference between the upper and lower cut-off frequencies).
bandwidth
the more natural the tone, as (especially) boosting narrow bands of frequencies (particularly in the midrange) tends to sound harsh, narrow bandwidths are normally reserved for the correction or cutting of
AudioGenerally used to mean "sound"; technically it describes periodic fluctuations of air pressure or electrical energy at frequencies and amplitudes within the human range of hearing; sound, or electrical energy that represents sound; acoustic, mechanical, or electrical frequencies corresponding to normally audible sound waves.
audio
. Most EQ circuits have a
BypassAllowing an audio signal through a device without affecting it. Used for A/B comparisons.
bypass
facility, enabling you to quickly compare the original signal with the processed one.


Notch Filters

Notch
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filters
have a very narrow
BandwidthThe range of frequencies passed by a bandpass filter (the difference between the upper and lower cut-off frequencies).
bandwidth
and are often sweepable, but generally only offer
CutTo make a break or split in a piece of audio. Traditionally this was done with a razor blade where magnetic tape was physically cut.
cut
rather than
TrimThe initial gain control on a mixer or other audio device such as a mic preamp, often labelled 'gain'. Trim/gain adjustment is crucial to maintaining a clean gain structure and good signal-to-noise ratio.
gain
. They are most often used to remove problem frequencies such as mains
HumUnwanted sound of a specific frequency constantly present in an audio signal, often caused by interference from AC mains power and therefore occurring at 50Hz or mathematically related frequencies.
hum
, or in manual or automatic
FeedbackThe phenomenon whereby audio picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup that is then played from a speaker close or loud enough for it to be captured again by the same source. If left the signal will continuously loop, with any resonant frequency causing the undesirable 'howling' sound often heard at concerts.
feedback
suppression systems for live sound – once the frequency of the
FeedbackThe phenomenon whereby audio picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup that is then played from a speaker close or loud enough for it to be captured again by the same source. If left the signal will continuously loop, with any resonant frequency causing the undesirable 'howling' sound often heard at concerts.
feedback
has been found, it can be attenuated quickly.


Graphic EQ

Graphic equalisers get their name from the visual representation they give of their effect on the frequency spectrum. A series of sliders, each with its own frequency band, usually covers the full audible range from 20Hz to 20kHz,. A standard 31-band graphic equaliser spaces its controls a third of an octave apart. Each band consists of a fixed frequency
ClippingAudio distortion caused by overloading, visible as flattened waveform peaks at the maximum possible voltage.
peaking
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filter
of narrow Q, applying
BoostIn audio mixing this refers to increasing the gain or amplitude of an audio signal. Usually employed in equalisation.
boost
or
CutTo make a break or split in a piece of audio. Traditionally this was done with a razor blade where magnetic tape was physically cut.
cut
to that frequency range when the slider is moved up or down from it centre position, the exceptions being the highest and lowest which are usually
ShelvingAn equalisation circuit in which frequencies above or below a given frequency are cut or boosted evenly, as opposed to a response that slopes off on either side of a centre frequency.
shelving
FilterA circuit used to remove or accentuate frequencies in a sound source. Common types are found on mixing consoles equalisation, synthesizers and dedicated processors such as graphic equalisers.
filters
.

Graphic EQ


Klark Teknik 31 band Graphic EQ

Graphic EQs are usually applied to complete mixes of sound, particularly live, to go some way towards correcting room response. For this reason they often come as dual-channel units, more sophisticated models with built-in spectrum analysers and a measurement
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
microphone
.

 

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