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Online Guide Recording e-guitars
Microphone Positioning

 

It’s usually preferable to place
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
microphones
close to the speaker when recording, where great differences in sound can be achieved with subtle changes in position and direction.

A good starting place is to point the
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
directly at the speaker, somewhere between the centre and the edge of the cone. Generally, the closer you place the
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
to the centre of the cone, the brighter and harsher the sound will be, whereas going closer to the edge will give a softer and warmer tone.

Microphone Positioning

If a
CardioidA heart-shaped microphone response pattern. In effect, cardioid mics are generally directional, but not strongly unidirectional.
cardioid
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
is placed very close to the cone you will experience the ‘proximity effect’, giving the sound increased
BassThe lowest part of the audio frequency range; in popular music, a (generally) rhythmic, low frequency melodic line emphasising the root notes of the chord progression.
bass
response, and although this effect is usually avoided in most recording situations, it can work very well with guitar amps, giving a really beefy sound. Varying the angle of the
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
and distance from the speaker will give subtly different results, so it’s worth setting aside plenty of time to experiment.

It’s important that you always reference your
Monitor1) Recording studio loudspeaker. 2) Stage loudspeaker, usually wedge-shaped, facing the performers so that they may hear themselves. 3) Computer display screen.
monitors
in isolation from the live sound - even if the sound coming from the guitar
AmpereUnit of current; the amount of electricity flowing through a conductor. One Ampere is equal to the flow of 6.25x10^18 electrons through a conductor in one second.
amp
is great, you have to make sure it translates well to the recording. If you don’t have the luxury of a separate recording space and an assistant engineer, try wearing closed back headphones when setting up the
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
– this allows accurate monitoring of the recording without the distraction of the direct sound from the
AmplifierA device for increasing the power of a signal by taking power from a supply and shaping the output to match the input signal.
amplifier
.

The use of additional
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
microphones
positioned further away from the
AmpereUnit of current; the amount of electricity flowing through a conductor. One Ampere is equal to the flow of 6.25x10^18 electrons through a conductor in one second.
amp
will pick up more ambient sound and generally complement the close
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
setup. When using this method, always be aware of
PhaseIn audio and signal processing in general, phase describes the relationship between one or more signals and time. If two signals are identical but one is delayed by less than one complete wave cycle, the difference is described as a phase difference. This is normally expressed in degrees, with 360 representing a full wavelength.
phase
cancellation; this is where two very similar signals are received a short time apart (due to the differences in distance from the source) causing potential problems on playback. If the signal is played back on a
MonoSingle-channel sound recording or mix, as opposed to multi-channel formats such as stereo and surround sound.
mono
device it can disappear altogether, so a good way to test for potential problems is by pressing your desk or DAW’s
MonoSingle-channel sound recording or mix, as opposed to multi-channel formats such as stereo and surround sound.
mono
button. You can correct any problems caused by
PhaseIn audio and signal processing in general, phase describes the relationship between one or more signals and time. If two signals are identical but one is delayed by less than one complete wave cycle, the difference is described as a phase difference. This is normally expressed in degrees, with 360 representing a full wavelength.
phase
cancellation on most larger mixing desks and
DAWDigital Audio Workstation - a general term applied to any non-linear audio recorder/editor/mixer encompassing dedicated hardware and software components in a single system. Examples of this are Digidesign Pro Tools or Roland VS series DAWs.
DAWs
by simply inverting the
PhaseIn audio and signal processing in general, phase describes the relationship between one or more signals and time. If two signals are identical but one is delayed by less than one complete wave cycle, the difference is described as a phase difference. This is normally expressed in degrees, with 360 representing a full wavelength.
phase
of one of the signals. Even if cancellation is not a big problem, it’s worth playing with the
PhaseIn audio and signal processing in general, phase describes the relationship between one or more signals and time. If two signals are identical but one is delayed by less than one complete wave cycle, the difference is described as a phase difference. This is normally expressed in degrees, with 360 representing a full wavelength.
phase
of the different
MicrophoneA device which converts airborne sound into an electrical signal.
mic
signals as this can yield radically different results.

 

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