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Online-Guide Portable Multitrackers
Glossary

 

On this page you can find frequently asked questions on: "Portable Multitrackers".

 

Digital Editing

Location Points

Track Bouncing

Punch In/Out

Auto-Punch

Mute and Solo

Sample Rate

Mastering

Non-Linear Editing

 

Question: Digital Editing
Answer: Just as you are able to manipulate text in a word processor, you can also cut, copy, paste and insert audio tracks on multitrack recorders.

Question: Location Points
Answer: These enable you to visually mark specific points of a song such as verses and choruses, so that you can quickly and conveniently navigate around without having to continually search through– highly convenient when used in conjunction with copy and paste functions.

Question: Track Bouncing
Answer: If you’re running out of tracks, you can mix several of them down to one or two in order to free them up. This is a handy trick, but care should be taken, as unless you’re using virtual tracks, you cannot later remix.

Question: Punch In/Out
Answer: This feature is often used to replace mistakes or re-record parts of a track that could have been performed better. It lets you enable and disable recording while playing back the song to record the part on the fly. Also sometimes referred to as ‘dropping’ in/out.

Question: Auto-Punch
Answer: Short for ‘Automatic Punch In/Out’, it makes punching in and out both easier and more precise. Typically available on higher-end multitrackers, the feature allows users to set ‘in’ and ‘out’ recording points, which will cause the recorder to automatically drop in and out of record.

Question: Mute and Solo
Answer: Pressing a track’s mute button will simply remove its output from the mix until the button is pushed again. Soloing a track produces the opposite result - all channels are muted except the one being soloed.

Question: Sample Rate
Answer: The sample rate is a measure of how many times per second the source material is being ‘sampled’. Sample rate affects the frequency response of the final recording - the highest frequency that can be accurately represented is just under half the sample rate. Generally speaking, the higher the sample rate, the better the sound quality, but the most sensible sample rate to use will depend on your system - the higher the rate, the more storage required, and sometimes the lower the track count. The law of diminishing returns definitely applies here – 96kHz does not sound twice as good as 48kHz!

Question: Mastering
Answer: The process whereby recorded material is taken from the multitracker and prepared for duplication in the format of the final release. This can include any or all of the following - equalisation, compression, limiting, normalisation, stereo widening, fades, and simply arranging the songs in the desired order.

Question: Non-Linear Editing
Answer: The editing of audio on a system that has the ability to randomly access data, with the upshot that the user can define a region and move it forward or backward in relation to other regions.

 

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Contents:

[Contents] [Multitracker or Computer?] [Types of Multitracker] [Storage] [Input] [Recording] [Editing & Processing] [Effects & Amp Modelling] [Extras] [Glossary] [Hotdeals] [Conclusion and Feedback]
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