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Online Guide Wah Pedals
Playing Techniques

 

While many players simply use the
WahA general term for a device which modulates the sound of an instrument or voice to produce an effect that sounds like 'wah, wah' (sometimes described as a crying effect). The commonest devices are the wah mute, which is placed on the bell of a trumpet or other brass instrument and moved to produce the wah effect, and the wah-wah pedal, which applies the effect (via a rocking foot motion) to an instrument sound (typically electric guitar).
wah
pedal to ‘wah’ or ‘quack’, others take things a lot further:


Tone Control

Frank Zappa used
WahA general term for a device which modulates the sound of an instrument or voice to produce an effect that sounds like 'wah, wah' (sometimes described as a crying effect). The commonest devices are the wah mute, which is placed on the bell of a trumpet or other brass instrument and moved to produce the wah effect, and the wah-wah pedal, which applies the effect (via a rocking foot motion) to an instrument sound (typically electric guitar).
wah
pedals extensively, but not always in the conventional manner of simply rocking it back and forth - he often left it set in different positions to produce specific tones. Indeed, many other players such as Vai and Satriani have realised that they can use
WahA general term for a device which modulates the sound of an instrument or voice to produce an effect that sounds like 'wah, wah' (sometimes described as a crying effect). The commonest devices are the wah mute, which is placed on the bell of a trumpet or other brass instrument and moved to produce the wah effect, and the wah-wah pedal, which applies the effect (via a rocking foot motion) to an instrument sound (typically electric guitar).
wah
as a very powerful tone control – after all, it has the ability to
BoostIn audio mixing this refers to increasing the gain or amplitude of an audio signal. Usually employed in equalisation.
boost
a narrow range of frequencies to a far greater degree than any such controls found on guitar amplifiers.


Feedback

The
WahA general term for a device which modulates the sound of an instrument or voice to produce an effect that sounds like 'wah, wah' (sometimes described as a crying effect). The commonest devices are the wah mute, which is placed on the bell of a trumpet or other brass instrument and moved to produce the wah effect, and the wah-wah pedal, which applies the effect (via a rocking foot motion) to an instrument sound (typically electric guitar).
wah
pedal can be used to great effect in hunting for resonant frequencies when playing at
Volume1) In audio and music, the loudness or amplitude of a signal. 2) In computing, a fixed amount of storage space, addressed as a single entity ('C:', 'D:' etc). A physical drive may contain more than one volume, but a single volume may also span more than one drive!
volume
. By slowly moving the pedal, one can ‘tune in’ to specific harmonics, thereby encouraging
FeedbackThe phenomenon whereby audio picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup that is then played from a speaker close or loud enough for it to be captured again by the same source. If left the signal will continuously loop, with any resonant frequency causing the undesirable 'howling' sound often heard at concerts.
feedback
. Joe Satriani for one uses this to great effect.


Percussion

Virtually any un-pitched
DistortionIn most cases distortion is an undesirable alteration to a signal which occurs when a piece of equipment is driven with a input level that is too high for its operating level. Sometimes, as in the case of guitar distortion, this can be an intentional and desirable effect.
noise
created by the guitar, such as string
DampTo reduce vibrations - in music this usually refers to the technique of reducing an instrument's vibrations and overtones by touching it in some way, to shorten the length of the note and deaden the timbre of the sound. For example, a percussionist may place the palm of his hand on the skin of a kettle drum, or a guitarist might use the wrist of his plectrum hand to rest against the strings. Also used to describe the effects of acoustic treatment.
damping
and body striking, can be modulated by
WahA general term for a device which modulates the sound of an instrument or voice to produce an effect that sounds like 'wah, wah' (sometimes described as a crying effect). The commonest devices are the wah mute, which is placed on the bell of a trumpet or other brass instrument and moved to produce the wah effect, and the wah-wah pedal, which applies the effect (via a rocking foot motion) to an instrument sound (typically electric guitar).
wah
, giving it an almost drum-like quality. String scrapes work particularly well too!

 

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Contents:

[Contents] [What is a Wah-Wah?] [The Classics] [Filter Design] [Pedal Action] [Pedal Feel] [Switching] [Special types] [Where in the Signal Chain?] [Digital Products] [Multi-Fx] [Playing Techniques] [Auto-Wah] [Conclusion] [Feedback]
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